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the global public square." welcome and happy new year to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a terrific show for you naturally involving the attempted christmas bombing in the united states. before we get to it, i want to give you some of my own thoughts about that attempted terrorist attack. senator dianne feinstein says that she believes the united states government should overreact rather than underreact to these kinds of events. isn't that exactly backwards? the purpose of terrorism is not to kill the few hundred that are attacked, but to terrorize the tens upon tens of millions who watch. terrorism is unique as a military strategy and it defends for its effectiveness on the response of the society for it to work, all of us have to respond with fear and hysteria. so far we're doing just that. i don't mean to suggest by this that the system worked, obviously, it didn't. when u.s. officials got information from the terrorist father, they should have immediately checked if he had a visa or put him on a no-fly list. they should not have
where china is growing 9% a year and the united states remains, you know, slowly crawling out of a recession. there is a sense that we are saddled with debt and they are booming. are we witnessing some kind of power transition? >> you know, i think phrasing it in terms of a power transition, fareed, makes what's always a mistake in the economic area, which is to think in terms of zero sum games. we are witnessing an incredible and profound change in china and india and in many other emerging countries. we're seeing living standards grow for more people, more quickly than in any point in u.s., in global history. that is a hugely positive thing and it is a very fundamental thing. but that success is not, if we pursue the right policies, a threat to the united states. it is an enormous opportunity. it is more potential for us to grow our capacity to export than there ever has been before. that's why the president set a goal of doubling our exports over the next five years in the state of the union in creating 2 million jobs in the process. it is more potential for the united stat
, the world was weary of this nation. the united states, for example, didn't recognize haiti for the first 58 years of its existence until 1862, a year after the u.s. civil war began. and that was the official beginning of what continues to this day to be a difficult relationship. in 1915, the u.s. sent in a landing force to occupy the nation and the country was in a state of chaos and some said america simply wanted to protect its investments there. whatever the reasons for coming, the americans stayed for almost 20 years. and it was an often brutal occupation. the americans under franklin eleanor roosevelt withdrew in 1934. haiti remained a troubled and deeply chaotic place. 60 years later, they were back and in 1994 under the clinton administration, the american military went in again. this time they came to restore democracy and two years later haiti saw for the first time in its then almost 200-year history a peaceful transition of power from one democratically elected president to another. but then the earthquake and late wednesday afternoon, of course, america returned again. this time
in the united states around the world. today a mix of the new and the old. i wanted to show you, again, a few terrific panels we've done an also some new material of particular interest. now, in 16 days, president barack obama will have been leading the united states for exactly one year. the year was filled with challenges. afghanistan, iraq, the economy, health care. how did he meet those challenges? we spoke back in november with an extraordinary panel of eminent historians. peggy no-- i thought it was important to bring it you, again, now as we look back at the president's first year. also on the show a battle you might never have heard of. the battle of wanat. if you care about the u.s.' involvement in afghanistan you'll want to learn all about it. many say it encapsulated many of the problems that america faces in the world at large. the best military report and military expert in the country tom ricks joins me to tell you about it. >>> while most of the focus of the nation and this show is on the hot spots around the world, what about the rest of the world? we'll talk to the famous sch
. >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to our oviewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we see barack obama from two lenses this week. on the one hand, he's the president, directing america's formidable right to help the ease in haiti. he is the head of the democratic party, the party that just suffered a major electoral loss. a lot of analysis of what went wrong for the democrats of whether the country is in ideological terms to the left or to the right and what all this means for obama's presidency. is he a lame duck? let's start with some historical perspective. obama's presidential ratings one year into his tenure are roughly the same as ronald reagan and bill clinton and jimmy carter's. the two bushes had higher ratings 41 because of the collapse of the soviet union and number 43 because of the rallying effect on the presidency. it is not much worse than his predecessors so it can be corrected. what should he do? obama needs to start acting like a president and, particularly, the president he campaigned to become. for the last six months, barack ob
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5